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Author Topic: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)  (Read 17331 times)

richwill

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Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« on: February 21, 2015, 04:49:03 PM »
1. renewing tax/MoT whilst NOT in the UK? Do you bother?

2. legalities of driving mainland Europe (taxing or testing) your vehichle?

Anyone got any links to extended travels across mainland Europe (in excess of 1 yr)

mike? what are you doing or plan on doing related to this?

What happens when/should you arrive back in UK?

Cheers

Rich
Life is a journey. Make the most of it.

treevorb

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2015, 08:30:27 AM »
I haven't thought about this yet, we always come back for the winter and the MOT is due in Jan.
After talking to the guys at the testing station they told me I would need to get it booked in for a test as soon as I got back in UK to be legal here. They did not want to comment on the legalities of MOT expiring and still using your vehicle abroad.
I guess your insurance would be invalid as soon as it ran out as with tax.
Whenever we have been stopped by the police for vehicle checks in other countries they only seem interested in driving license and insurance and as long as we have supplied these have had no problems. Whether they can do other checks by radio or computer like they do here I do not know but I have always thought at border crossings they can get information about the vehicle and it's occupants from the registration and as long as the names tally with the reg you get waved straight through. Exeptions to this being Albania and Montenegro where we had to buy insurance as we entered as our ins company did not use the 'green card' system.
I did hear something about the driver penalty points system becoming a Europe wide thing last week so the European authorities must have access to each others record systems to keep track on driver details so if this is the case for vehicle records to we will need to find out, you can bet they ar not going to let you continue in an old van if you are 3000 mile from home and your MOT expired 6 months ago, and whether the vehicle testing can be done in the country you are in will let you proceed.
We really need to find these things out before we get caught out.
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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2015, 10:27:13 AM »
A lot of Euro countries have different approaches to the MOT situation, as long as you are insured and have all your docs, you will be okay. I don't know about 6 months out of date though. Me personally would arrange to be back for the MOT and your tax.
If you are going away long term, sort it before you depart.
Ie: get it Moted and taxed, plus full insurance. 
You will get away with a lot of lax stuff, until you run over something/one, then all your docs have to be squeaky clean. Otherwise you are in clink before you can say Bobs your watsit.
Don't chance it, Euro drivers are as bad as ours, even if it's their fault you are the foreigner.
Besides if you are travelling for more than a year all the local rules will apply, whatever.

Camper Van Travels

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2015, 06:53:29 PM »
Just get the full MOT just before you leave UK shores then you don't have to worry about it for 12 months.

On the insurance front, I get 30 days fully comp cover in Europe after which period of time it reverts to 3rd party (fire and theft) cover only. In the event of a collision after the 30 days cover (fully comp) any damage to my own van isn't covered but damage to any other vehicle if the collision was my fault is covered.

Just remember that in France it is also mandatory to carry a set number of items in your vehicle, now don't quote me on the list below, just make sure you check the legal requirements online first, for example directly from the AA website.

If you wear glasses you must have a spare pair in your vehicle.

A warning triangle.

High visibility vest/s or jacket/s.

A spare bulb kit.

A full first aid kit.

A digital alcohol breathalyser.

Headlamp adjustment for driving on the other side of the road so you don't dazzle oncoming drivers of vehicles traveling in the opposite direction to you.

Failure to have any of these items on board your van (or adjustments made) if you are stopped by the police could make you liable to an on the spot 80 euro fine.

Camper Van Travels

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2015, 07:00:52 PM »
Also it might be worth considering European breakdown cover.

For this service go to the German equivalent of the AA, it's cost effective and excellent value for money - ADAC. (You might need to confirm on the telephone that this is still being made available to drivers in the UK - don't worry they speak perfect English). This breakdown company was established 112 years ago.

I think it's less than 100 euros for full European cover. In other words, if your van develops a major fault in lets say Corinth, Greece - you will get the full recovery service back to the French port for the ferry crossing back to the UK where your UK breakdown cover will take over and take you back home or to a garage for repairs.

More information can be found here:

http://www.adac.de/mitgliedschaft/adac_membership/

Tai-chi wanderer

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2015, 07:16:47 PM »
Can I just add to the above ... all docs, reg book, insurance, mot, license, not copies, and if in Spain 2 x warning triangles. They always are awkward barstewards.

If wild parking and the local bill wake you up, don't argue just drive, with a broad smile apologizing profusely. They have guns and it's their country, be very, very polite. So the motto here is be always prepared.
May never happen but there are stories. We have been told to vamoose, and we did, those who remonstrated had to drive to the cop shop.

richwill

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2015, 07:54:41 AM »
I haven't thought about this yet, we always come back for the winter and the MOT is due in Jan.
After talking to the guys at the testing station they told me I would need to get it booked in for a test as soon as I got back in UK to be legal here. They did not want to comment on the legalities of MOT expiring and still using your vehicle abroad.
I guess your insurance would be invalid as soon as it ran out as with tax.
Whenever we have been stopped by the police for vehicle checks in other countries they only seem interested in driving license and insurance and as long as we have supplied these have had no problems. Whether they can do other checks by radio or computer like they do here I do not know but I have always thought at border crossings they can get information about the vehicle and it's occupants from the registration and as long as the names tally with the reg you get waved straight through. Exeptions to this being Albania and Montenegro where we had to buy insurance as we entered as our ins company did not use the 'green card' system.
I did hear something about the driver penalty points system becoming a Europe wide thing last week so the European authorities must have access to each others record systems to keep track on driver details so if this is the case for vehicle records to we will need to find out, you can bet they ar not going to let you continue in an old van if you are 3000 mile from home and your MOT expired 6 months ago, and whether the vehicle testing can be done in the country you are in will let you proceed.
We really need to find these things out before we get caught out.

it was why i asked ;-) mainly because i don't know myself.

thanks for the response though, some real insight in there.

Rich
Life is a journey. Make the most of it.

richwill

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2015, 07:56:11 AM »
A lot of Euro countries have different approaches to the MOT situation, as long as you are insured and have all your docs, you will be okay. I don't know about 6 months out of date though. Me personally would arrange to be back for the MOT and your tax.
If you are going away long term, sort it before you depart.
Ie: get it Moted and taxed, plus full insurance. 
You will get away with a lot of lax stuff, until you run over something/one, then all your docs have to be squeaky clean. Otherwise you are in clink before you can say Bobs your watsit.
Don't chance it, Euro drivers are as bad as ours, even if it's their fault you are the foreigner.
Besides if you are travelling for more than a year all the local rules will apply, whatever.

so maybe a couple of dashcams? (seem to be the rage anyway). Still wondering though, what happens if you go long term >1 year.

Rich
Life is a journey. Make the most of it.

richwill

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2015, 07:58:20 AM »
Also it might be worth considering European breakdown cover.

For this service go to the German equivalent of the AA, it's cost effective and excellent value for money - ADAC. (You might need to confirm on the telephone that this is still being made available to drivers in the UK - don't worry they speak perfect English). This breakdown company was established 112 years ago.

I think it's less than 100 euros for full European cover. In other words, if your van develops a major fault in lets say Corinth, Greece - you will get the full recovery service back to the French port for the ferry crossing back to the UK where your UK breakdown cover will take over and take you back home or to a garage for repairs.

More information can be found here:

http://www.adac.de/mitgliedschaft/adac_membership/

really useful stuff too. thanks.

Rich
Life is a journey. Make the most of it.

Roman

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2015, 01:17:38 PM »
Maybe this link could help regarding insurance and a long term trip.
Just a good read anyway.

"Mark's trip halfway around the world and back in a Toyota Landcruiser"

https://overlandcruiser.wordpress.com


Dudegoeswalkabout

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2015, 12:17:41 PM »
While looking for the rules on MOT/Tax/insurance online, I found lots of conflicting information.  So I wrote to DVLA asking what the rules are and why the rules are so hard to find.  They have just replied today, a copy of which I include below (personal details removed).  It would seem things aren't all that straight forward, and the time restraints on how long you can be overseas before declaring your vehicle as exported are no doubt monitored by the ANPR systems at the borders.

So, straight from the horses mouth....

Quote
Dear (REMOVED)

 

Thank you for your email received on 28/2/15. Your email reference number is (REMOVED).

 

European Union (EU) vehicles which are circulating temporarily within or between community Member States are allowed under EC Directive 83/182, to be used on public roads without the need to register or pay duties in the host country. These provisions limit visits to six months in a twelve-month period and the vehicle must comply with the registration and licensing requirements of its home country.

 

A vehicle needs to be declared as exported by sending section 11 of the V5C registration certificate to DVLA if the vehicle is to be taken out of the country for more than 12 months, and then re-registered as a re-imported vehicle when returning to the UK.

 

We cannot anticipate what action, if any, the authorities of the host country might take upon a visiting British vehicle which is untaxed or does not have an MOT.



Unfortunately, you would not be able to re-tax the vehicle while you are abroad, unless you hold a current British MOT, therefore, the vehicle could not be re-taxed until it's return to Great Britain. I must point out that you would be committing an offence as soon as you drive off the ferry with an untaxed vehicle unless you are proceeding to a pre-arranged MOT test. You must be insured for the journey.



Once an MOT certificate has been obtained, the vehicle must be driven to your home address and removed from the road until you can purchase vehicle tax . You may re-tax the vehicle at any Post OfficeŽ branch that deals with vehicle tax. You should take with you the Registration Certificate V5C MOT Certificates, the appropriate fee and an Insurance Certificate or Cover note for vehicles registered with a Northern Ireland address(downloaded or faxed copies are acceptable, however photocopies are not).

 

For further information regarding MOT's you will need to contact the organisation below:

 


Vehicle and Operator Services Agency
Ellipse

Padley Road

Swansea

SA1 8AN


Telephone number: 0300 123 9000

Fax: 01792 454313
Website: www.vosa.gov.uk
email: enquiries@vosa.gov.uk


 

It may also be helpful to contact the AA or RAC 'Overseas Motoring Advice Services' who may be able to advise further.

 

The rates of vehicle tax for all vehicle types are available on the website www.gov.uk/vehicle-tax-rate-tables

 

Do not reply to this email. If you wish to contact us again about this response then please use our Reply Form or copy and paste the following URL in to your browser:

 

https://emaildvla.direct.gov.uk/emaildvla/cegemail/dvla/en/reply_form_vehicles.html

 

When filling in the form the email reference number (REMOVED) will be required.

 

Regards

 

K Hughes

DVLA Contact Centre

Tai-chi wanderer

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2015, 01:17:25 PM »
Have been away for almost exactly a year, in Spain you can visit for 6 month with your Nat. countries docs. In any one 12 months
Going across Europe and crossing borders confuses them so you can get away with it!

After one year if you get stopped and you have not the proper docs. you're stuffed, most of the Police are pretty savvy, so won't get away with, 'me no understandy'
In Spain they have been known to confiscate vehicles and crush them, no second chance.

We wanted to stay with friends for another couple of months working on their Gites, so I popped back with the van and a laptop and booked in MOT, roadtax and insurance, using my son in laws address. Our mail was reg. there, so no probs.
Also gone the route of reg. vans/cars in France & Spain over the years, what a hassle and expensive.

Used to be able to buy a Dutch/German vehicle, (on Fleabay) collect and insure/MOT it, in France/Spain. Don't know if they have closed this avenue yet. Because you are buying in Europe they will deal with you, especially if you have a friendly local address.

So in summary you gotta year hassle free. After that you are living on your wits.

anreos

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Re: Long Term Travelling (whaddya do about?)
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2019, 12:55:40 PM »
Hello! My family and I want to travel around the country and live in the van next summer. can you advise how should we start? we are new to this. By the way, I wonder if the van has an address? a zip code? If yes, how can I do the zip code lookup? Is it okay here https://worldpostalcode.com/ or there are other sites? I'm interested because we like to order food from home))