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Author Topic: 1 kWh @ 230V  (Read 165 times)

r4v3r23

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1 kWh @ 230V
« on: May 31, 2019, 08:46:11 PM »
so I want to install an electrical appliance that consumes 1kWh per day @ 230V

what must I do to make this happen?

Voltage 230 V
Max. 190 W / 1,0 A / 220-240 V / 50 + 60 Hz
Power consumption aprox. ca. 1,0 KWh/24 Std.

Camper_Dan

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Re: 1 kWh @ 230V
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2019, 06:14:45 AM »
Greetings!

Let's start at the beginning and tell us exactly what appliance we're talking about, because that can  make a huge difference.

Cheers!
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r4v3r23

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Re: 1 kWh @ 230V
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2019, 08:56:07 AM »
its a dry-aging fridge. is this the way to go?

https://www.tesla.com/en_GB/powerwall?redirect=no
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 09:39:09 AM by r4v3r23 »

Camper_Dan

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Re: 1 kWh @ 230V
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2019, 04:44:24 PM »
Greetings!

That power wall is worthless without a way to charge it.

Due to continually varying temps & humidity in a vehicle, your power usage is likely triple or more, and quite possibly such a unit might not be able to keep up with these changes even if you could provide the power.

I think you're going to need either constant shore power or a constantly running generator for one of those, same as you would for a typical air conditioner.

One option might be to put it into a storage unit and power it through there.

Cheers!
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r4v3r23

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Re: 1 kWh @ 230V
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2019, 05:09:09 PM »
Greetings!

That power wall is worthless without a way to charge it.

Due to continually varying temps & humidity in a vehicle, your power usage is likely triple or more, and quite possibly such a unit might not be able to keep up with these changes even if you could provide the power.

I think you're going to need either constant shore power or a constantly running generator for one of those, same as you would for a typical air conditioner.

One option might be to put it into a storage unit and power it through there.

Cheers!

This system will be hooked up to a 300W solar panel for charging. Also, couldn't I just install the Powerwall and charge it via shore whenever i get the chance? The Powerwall will store a lot of energy

Camper_Dan

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Re: 1 kWh @ 230V
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2019, 09:18:33 PM »
Greetings!

When I had 700 watts of solar, the most I ever got out of it 1400 watts on the best day, 600-700 watts on a normal day, and under 300 watts on many days, especially in the winter, even though the sun was shining.  Then we need to take into account rainy days, cloudy days, and partially cloudy days, as well as the desire to park in the shade during the summer.

I no longer have solar on my van, it's too expensive and too unreliable.  It's much easier to use less power, than it  is to generate and store lots of power.  So today instead of having a 1,000 amp battery bank, I have a single 100 amp battery that I simply charge while driving, a cheap $99 generator, and a cheap battery charger if I need shore power or to charge my battery off grid, and a simple extension cord and an outlet strip for if shore power is available and I need it. (Practically never).

Solar and battery power is going to be a never ending headache for what you're trying to achieve.  Short of a very large school bus, you're not going to have enough roof space for enough solar panels, or the carrying capacity for enough batteries.  Even then you're looking at a $10+ initial setup, and an additional $1,000's a year in replacement batteries every year or so because solar kills batteries prematurely due to it's incorrect charging method.

You need something extremely stable to sustain something like that, and solar and batteries isn't going to cut it.  I would also be very concerned about the life of a unit like that being subjected to being in a moving vehicle.  Most household  items aren't built to withstand the constant bumps, vibrations, and inertia forces encountered in vehicles.

People who are successful at this lifestyle have come to understand that you are camping, and not living in a house or apartment.  Many things that seem easy in a house are either impossible or impractical to try to implement in a moving vehicle, and with limited powerr capabilities.  If you can stay parked with shore power for as long as it takes, then maybe...  Otherwise you're likely in for a very rough and rocky road ahead.

Cheers!




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