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Author Topic: 1999 Turtle Top conversion van headliner sagging  (Read 3402 times)

TallTex

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1999 Turtle Top conversion van headliner sagging
« on: December 17, 2017, 04:56:23 PM »
Hi, I have a 1999 Ford E-250 conversion van that is a Turtle Top High Top high top and interior conversion. 

The headliner's decorative center wood trim piece with mood and reading lights installed is screwed into a strip of hidden plywood that is glued to the foam side of the headliner vinyl material.  This hidden plywood support is not attached to the fiberglass Turlet top roof, or anything else from the feel/looks of it,  but rather hanging (sagging) loose from Turtle Top ceiling.  It appears the only thing supporting the entire weight of the entire headliner or ceiling is the vinyl headliner material itself. 

My questions are:  Was this the OEM install?  Or has the hidden plywood mounting become detached from the Turtle Top ceiling/roof? I can send phone photos if it would be helpful to see what I am speaking about.

I am trying to figure out how I can access the topside of the headliner panel in order to secure the hidden plywood strip via epoxy resin, construction adhesive, etc. to the Turtle Top roof so the headliner does not come down on the occupants someday if the vinyl ages and gives way.

Camper_Dan

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Re: 1999 Turtle Top conversion van headliner sagging
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2017, 10:19:20 PM »
Greetings & Welcome!

Sounds like your diagnosis is correct, that the center console was originally attached to the fiberglass top, probably with some sort of adhesive.

The problem now lies in getting to it to reattach it, without destroying the headliner in the process.  If the headliner isn't glued in, it should be possible.  But  if it is in fact glued in, you will likely destroy it in an attempt to remove it.

Adhesives like liquid nails use a caulking gun.  It might be possible  to make a dime size hole, add an extension tube to the caulking tube tip, and insert the liquid nails or other adhesive that way.  There is also spray on adhesive.  It may be possible to add a tube, similar to what you do with WD-40 only longer, to inject the adhesive that way.  I believe the liquid nails would work better and last longer.

Once you have successfully re-glued it, you will probably need to keep pressure on it for at least 48 hours for the adhesive to fully cure.  (It's usually 24 hours in the summer.)  You can support it with boards going to the floor, or a trick I use is to cover boards in felt to protect the headliner, then use adjustable tent poles to support everything.  If necessary, for a little extra tension, you can add shims on the floor end.

Once completed you could add a puck light over the hole you had to create, and nobody will be able to detect your repair.

Good Luck & keep us posted!
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TallTex

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Re: 1999 Turtle Top conversion van headliner sagging
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2017, 04:01:22 AM »
Thank you.