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Author Topic: Soundproofing the cab of our luton/box truck conversion!  (Read 559 times)

acoupleofadventurers

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Soundproofing the cab of our luton/box truck conversion!
« on: December 12, 2018, 03:06:31 PM »
VIDEO HERE -> https://youtu.be/HlQzewrsFKU

So, a big problem with the engine in our van is how noisy it can be whilst driving. Before we tackled soundproofing our cab, it was difficult to hold a conversation while travelling at full speed (50-60mph).

We used basic materials which are all readily available from DIY shops and the results are good, Idling decibals hav dropped by about 5-7db and, although we don't have exact figures for the improvement whilst at full speed, it has definitely improved. We can now talk while on the move without having to shout and each journey does not end with ringing in the ears!

A good result overall for a total cost of about 50.

An added bonus is that the cab is also now much warmer and better insulated.

Camper_Dan

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Re: Soundproofing the cab of our luton/box truck conversion!
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2018, 11:36:52 PM »
Greetings!

Commercial vehicles just cost so much to convert and make livable, that I have just stopped converting them to start with.  If you start with a passenger vehicle, either a van or a bus, they are designed to be passenger friendly and quiet inside to begin with, and the windows have so many advantages over windowless vehicles it's amazing.

Passenger vans typically have 1/2"-3/4" thick felt padding under the carpet to dampen road noise, and wick any moisture away from the metal, and to the interior where it can be evaporated out, avoiding the rusted out floor issues.  Every other scheme, rubber, wood, or vinyl seems to result in moisture, mold, and rust problems.

You can't stop or prevent condensation, so you either have to deal with it, or use materials that are moisture proof like aluminum, fiberglass, or some other rust and moisture proof material.

Cheers!
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